Breanna Denney /Nevada Sagebrush Students of the University of Nevada, Reno pass a campaign sign for candidate Royce Feuer in Hilliard Plaza on Monday, Feb. 23. Feuer, a presidential candidate for the Associated Students of the University of Nevada has made it apparent that he does not want the student body vote for him.

Breanna Denney /Nevada Sagebrush
Students of the University of Nevada, Reno pass a campaign sign for candidate Royce Feuer in Hilliard Plaza on Monday, Feb. 23. Feuer, a presidential candidate for the Associated Students of the University of Nevada has made it apparent that he does not want the student body vote for him.

By Maddison Cervantes

Royce Feuer, a sixth-year senior at the University of Nevada, Reno, has begun a presidential campaign for the Associated Students of the University of Nevada. However, this is no ordinary campaign; Feuer’s platform encourages students to not vote for him.

“Imagine you are 6 years old, and your mom says we are going to Denny’s for dinner,” Feuer said. “Now, you like Denny’s, but the fact that your mom made the decision for you, leaves you unsatisfied.”

According to Feuer, when an individual is given a choice in any situation, it is more fulfilling even when the outcome is the same.

Also running for the presidential office is ASUN Speaker of the Senate Caden Fabbi, who has three years of experience in the student government behind him.

Without Feuer’s campaign, Fabbi would be the only one in the race for the presidential office.

Feuer is registered to graduate in May, making his campaign raise even more questions. If Feuer is elected president, the elected vice president will automatically move into office once Feuer graduates.

Despite this fact, Feuer’s campaign still stands.

An 8-foot-tall campaign sign in Hilliard Plaza features the hash tag #dontvoteforroyce, and a recently-released video of Feuer and his campaign team at one of their meetings featured them humorously conversing, without a notably serious sentence.

The direction in which students are perceiving Feuer’s campaign production will be determined once the votes are counted.

“Royce has every right to run, there’s nothing that our governing doctrines that says a graduating senior can’t run for an office of any kind,” Fabbi said. “It’s kind of cool to have another candidate, if nothing else, so that the student body can have the choice to vote.”

Fabbi explained his seriousness toward his campaign, and his decision to not view ASUN as a joke. His history with the organization has equipped Fabbi to manage the responsibilities of presidency, along with its $2.3 million budget.

Feuer has no prior experience in the student government, and claims that his participation in the election exists only to create an unforgettable campaign, and to preserve the competitive nature of the election process.

“I’m a person who really likes to take a ‘what if’ scenario that I have control over and not make it a ‘what if’ scenario,” Feuer said. “I wanted to make it a competition, because I think handing it over would be allowing someone to take the position for granted.”

Feuer’s campaign was specifically designed to convince the student body that he is the wrong choice for ASUN president. However, his plan of attack does not exactly add up for some.

Current ASUN Vice President Alex Bybee sees Feuer’s candidacy as being potentially problematic for ASUN.

“I haven’t spoken to [Feuer] specifically about his campaign, but I know there is one big issue with his candidacy: he graduates in May,” Bybee said. “So if he should win, whoever is elected vice president is automatically ascended to the presidency. Since a vote for [Feuer] would effectively mean the coronation of whoever is elected [vice president,] it worries me a little.”

If Feuer was elected, regardless of whether he makes the choice to remain in office or step down, will the ASUN presidency be in good hands?

Feuer has made it apparent that his participation in the election is specifically for the construction of his campaign, not the results. Regardless of Feuer’s intentions, he believes that students will make the right choice on election day.

“Saying I don’t want to win is a hard thing for me to say just in general,” Feuer said. “But I feel like winning has a different definition in this case; I want to win what my goals are with my campaign. Don’t vote for Royce.”

Maddison Cervantes can be reached at mcervantes@sagebrush.unr.edu and on Twitter @madcervantes.